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¡ATA is flattening the curve!

ATA is doing its part to promote a healthy space for the exhibition of innovative art and the exchange of non-conformist ideas… and complying with the order to shelter in place through April 7.

Our storefront micro-cinema is closed and some of our program screenings will soon be online. Stay tuned!

We continue, like you, to disinfect our surfaces, wash our hands, not touch our faces, and monitor SF Department of Health directives. We will keep you in the loop on changes to our screening and exhibition schedule.

Shapeshifters Cinema

Shapeshifters Cinema and Brewery Promises Art Film Refuge in an Oakland Victorian
By Sam Lefebvre

Kathleen Quillian (L) and Gilbert Guerrero (R) founded Shapeshifters as an experimental film series in 2012. (Sam Lefebvre/KQED)

In the Bay Area, alternative exhibition spaces for experimental film and video have long provided artists of the moving image a sense of community and interdisciplinary collaboration. In the early 1960s, filmmaker Bruce Baillie established Canyon Cinema as a screening series in the wooded East Bay hamlet of Canyon for avant-garde and family fare alike. Canyon filmmakers made inroads with composers at the San Francisco Tape Music Center, and published freewheeling newsletters that evinced a natural rapport with painters and poets. Instead of an indie studio system, Canyon inspired or anticipated other local artist-run organizations central to local developments in abstract, personal, vernacular and queer cinema.

Canyon endures as a distributor of 16mm avant-garde film prints, and its programming spinoff, San Francisco Cinematheque, curates the CROSSROADS film festival—this year at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Artists Television Access on Valencia Street is another visible example of its legacy. Like other noncommercial art forms, however, rising cost of living seriously threatens the scene: Eviction last year ended Black Hole, an Oakland screening series that carried forward Canyon’s anti-institutional origins, but not before spawning the Light Field film festival. Challenges aside, the Bay Area remains a destination for filmmakers “ill at ease with cinema as entertainment but rather fondly fixated on the apparatus, the alchemy of light,” as curator Steve Seid described local postwar celluloid artists in the 2010 book Radical Light.

Now, a renovated Victorian below Interstate 880 near Oakland’s Jack London District promises a sustainable, brick-and-mortar refuge for a community rooted in homespun exhibitions and collaborative intimacy. Gilbert Guerrero and Kathleen Quillian, founders of the Shapeshifters series at Temescal Arts Center (TAC), quietly opened the 1,200-square-foot space at 567 5th Street last year as a 40-seat microcinema, and they’re building an on-site nanobrewery with plans for a small taproom to subsidize film programming. Guerrero, an award-winning homebrewer, described the model as a response to diminishing grants funding for small arts organizations. “Shapeshifters has been a series,” he said. “We want this to be an institution.”

The 40-seat microcinema will accommodate various projector configurations for experimental film screenings.
The 40-seat microcinema will accommodate various projector configurations for experimental film screenings. (Sam Lefebvre/KQED)

Founded in 2012 as a free monthly event, Shapeshifters showcases “expanded cinema,” film generally involving live performance, for instance multi-projector work or sound-image collaboration. “It was at capacity almost immediately,” said TAC director and curator Leyya Tawil. Steve Polta, filmmaker and director of the San Francisco Cinematheque, called Shapeshifters a “space to workshop and experiment,” noting the evolution in programming fixtures such as Kit Young and Lori Varga. Other artists who’ve been featured in the series include Other Cinema founder Craig Baldwin, Sofía Córdova with Las Sucias, Greg Pope with Voicehandler, Kerry Laitala, Oracle Plus, Tommy Becker, Suki O’Kane and the late Paul Clipson.

Shapeshifters Cinema and Brewery will house Shapeshifters programming and events brought by other curators, filling a deep need for film exhibition space in Oakland. According to Polta, half of San Francisco Cinematheque attendees live in the East Bay. “So there’s a filmmaker community and also an audience community,” he said. And the microcinema is small and nimble enough for esoteric or technically-challenging work. For example, Polta hopes to bring Bruce Elder. The Canadian filmmaker’s shorter pieces run upwards of three hours, making them cost-prohibitive to show at many rental venues. As the head of a nonprofit, Polta also said he understands Shapeshifters’ transition to earned income: “Less grants and more competition.”

Sponsored

Guerrero and Quillian met some 20 years ago as volunteers at Artists Television Access, where Guerrero is now on the board of directors, and founded Shapeshifters at first at the now-defunct Arbor cafe as a hub for the experimental film community closer to their home in Oakland. “One day I brought a chest of Tecate and thought, ‘I have way better beer at home,’” Guerrero said. He started Temescal Homebrewing in 2013, and in 2018 won first prize in the World Cup of Beer competition for his Synesthesia Pale Ale. A few years ago he took a small business course while considering launching a brewery, and then thought to combine the enterprise with Shapeshifters. Guerrero and Quillian signed a five-year lease on 567 5th St. in late 2018.

Kathleen Quillian (L) and Gilbert Guerrero (R) are fundraising to complete construction on Shapeshifters Cinema and Brewery.
Kathleen Quillian (L) and Gilbert Guerrero (R) are fundraising to complete construction on Shapeshifters Cinema and Brewery. (Sam Lefebvre/KQED)

Visitors enter the space, which looks residential from the street, through what Guerrero and Quillian envision as a small taproom with regular evening hours, and then proceed to a venue already outfitted with a large screen and dozens of salvaged church chairs. The seats are on rearrangeable wooden bases, and an additional screen is planned to accommodate various projector configurations. Guerrero, a homebrewing workshop leader in addition to his day job in user-experience design, plans to create the 3.5 barrel “nanobrewery” in the back room, with a fermenter built into a large outdoor deck. Guerrero and Quillian have spent more than $100,000 on permitting and other pre-construction costs, and are currently raising $30,000 on Indiegogo.

Meanwhile, Shapeshifters programming in the space is ongoing: A party and screening in association with Canyon Cinema for Shapeshifters “members,” a new category of ongoing financial supporters of the project, takes place on Saturday, Feb. 15, followed by a free presentation of Tommy Becker’s visual concept album Emotions in Metal on Saturday, Mar. 14. Black Hole founder Tooth, who presented drawings and his film Broken Symmetry at the space last year, and who now lives in New York, described Shapeshifters as a “luminous bright spot on the continuum of community-based, noncommercial artistic traditions.” He continued, “[It’s] one of the things that gives me hope that the Bay Area will weather the storm it finds itself in.”

#GivingTuesday

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Please click on our “Donate” link above to make a donation to ATA.

Thank you for your gifts on this day of giving!

CAT STICKS

ATA co presents CAT STICKS at 3rd i’s Film Festival — . 

CAT STICKS

New People Cinema, San FranciscoFriday November 8th at 9:00 pm

Hailed as one of the “most gorgeous and affecting films” presented at Slamdance Film Fest in recent years,this haunting film follows the stories of several heroin addicts over the course of one rain drenched night in Kolkata. The film’s bewitching score works in tandem with its mesmerizing B&W imagery, to create a work that is a must-see on the big screen!


Use promotional code “cp_2019 when purchasing tickets for CAT STICKS and receive 20% off an individual $11 ticket (until online sales end two hours before the screening. Online fees not discounted).

More details and tickets:    https://www.thirdi.org/event/cat-sticks/

SF Cinematheque presents: CROSSROADS 10

presented June 7–9 by San Francisco Cinematheque
and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 

curated by Steve Polta
all programs at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
151 Third Street (at Mission) in SF
download festival Press Release here
press inquiries please contact [email protected]
#xrdsx
Tickets for all screenings as well as Saturday/Sunday day passes available here

Pictured above: Lines of Force (2018) by Dan Browne


CROSSROADS 10 program 1
Friday, June 7 at 7 pm
unseeable light/a chorus of voids
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artists in person: Brent Coughenour, Kris Force and Michael A. Morris
Advance tickets available here.
Join our Facebook event.

CROSSROADS 10 opens with an entirely live program featuring a sensuously intense trio of immersive film/video performances that blur the lines between media. Kris Force’s Diamond Body presents a macroscopic video score for an electroacoustically activated string quintet. Michael A. Morris’s A Chorus of Black Voids Sings In Rays of Unseeable Light fuses 16mm film projection, analog video synthesis, and digital video re-projection. Brent Coughenour’s The Sick Sense 2 delivers a hallucinatory, flickering otoacoustic sine wave performance that pushes the perceptual system to its limits.

SCREENING: The Sick Sense 2 (2019) by Brent Coughenour; A Chorus of Black Voids Sings In Rays of Unseeable Light (2017) by Michael A. Morris; and Diamond Body (2018) by Kris Force
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 2
Friday, June 7 at 9:15 pm
strange weather
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artists in person: Emily Chao, Jon-Sesrie Goff and Lydia Moyer
Advance tickets available here.
Join our Facebook event.

Lydia Moyer’s masterful The Forcing caps a program of bracing, insistent views of turbulent times: glimpses of the shattered American landscape in the context of global climate change, political contraction, resistance, conflict, survival, and the strange immediacy of life experienced through screens. Suns beat our bones down while buzzard drones wing around. Confrontations with the infinite image bank stream through an abiding universe.

SCREENING: No Land (2018) by Emily Chao; This Climate (2017) by Jem CohenA Post Post-Racial Apolitical Ode (Colored Collage #3) (2018) by Jon-Sesrie Goff; and The Forcing (2018) by Lydia Moyer
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 3
Saturday, June 8 at 1 pm
other voices other rooms
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artist in person: Cristiana Miranda
Advance tickets (single screening) available here.
Saturday, June 8 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

Opening with a silent meditation on the cosmos, a study in celestial motion, these films critique the touristic gaze and blur the boundaries between the virtual and the real, between ethnography and fiction and rewrite traumatic histories while presenting visions both utopian and dystopic. Dynastic imaginary spaces erupt into our physical plane while virtual geographies turn back on themselves endlessly. A chorus of feminine voices, the deep murmur of subterranean waters, written and dreamed words, laughter, the ecstasy of rediscovered memory, the enlightenment.

SCREENING: Polly One (2018) by Kevin Jerome EversonA Room with a Coconut View (2018) by Tulapop SaenjaroenEl Laberinto/The Labyrinth (2018) by Laura Huertas Millán; and So many voices in the silence now/Tantas vozes no silêncio do agora (2018) by Cristiana Miranda
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 4
Saturday, June 8 at 3:15 pm
yes yes yes no no no
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Community Partner: GAZE
Anticipated artists in personRichard Ashrowan, Lorenzo Gattorna, Lucy Kerr, Courtney Stephens, and T2R/Laura Gillmore
Advance tickets available here.
Saturday, June 8 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

This program is dedicated to the memory of Carolee Schneemann (1939–2019).

Opening with Richard Ashrowen’s gestural Lumen, this program draws inspiration from the legacy of the departed Carolee Schneemann. These introspective films examine familial, filial, and romantic love, and love that is fading, blooming, and exorcised. Public and private performance, from the bedroom to the street. Moments of hesitation and connection. We’ve learned the languages of our masters. What geometry of desire will help overthrow the state? Meow.

SCREENING: Lumen (2018) by Richard AshrowanTo every bird, its own nest is beautiful/A ogni uccello il suo nido è bello (2018) by Lorenzo Gattorna3 Dreams of Horses (2018) by Mike HoolboomLydon (2018) by Lucy KerrMixed Signals (2018) by Courtney Stephenscold soup, pubic hair, raw meat (2018) by T2R/Laura Gillmore; The Bed and the Street (2018) by Heather Frise and Mike Hoolboom; Viet-Flakes (1965) by Carolee Schneemann; and Plumb Line (1971) by Carolee Schneemann
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 5
Saturday, June 8 at 5:15 pm
feeling gravity’s pull
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artists in person: Lyndsay Bloom, Lucy Kerr, Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu, Shona Masarin and Diana Sánchez
Advance tickets available here.
Saturday, June 8 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

There are so many stories and none of them are true. Lucy Kerr’s video/performance hybrid while you were awaygrounds a program of ascending bodies and bodies in collapse, mirrored, uplifted and adrift in the universe. Images of absence expose distance between actual and virtual selves. Tenderness. Suspension. Turn the pages of a book. Are these the rules of the game?

SCREENING: Ruins (2018) by Shona MasarinOven Scene (2018), Lyndsay BloomA Soft Place to Fall (2018) by Nan WangThe Pull (2017) by Elena ArtemenkoA Study of Fly (2018) by Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu; while you were away (2019) by Lucy KerrDorothy (2018) by Diana Sánchez; Giverny I (Négresse Impériale) (2017) by Ja’Tovia GaryBetween Dog and Wolf (2018) by Julia Dogra-Brazell; and you are not alone (2017) by Esther Urlus
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 6
Saturday, June 8 at 8 pm
our minds were light-years distant
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artists in person: Jeanne Liotta, Arte Matu, Lydia Moyer and T2R/Laura Gillmore
Advance tickets available here.
Saturday, June 8 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

Jeanne Liotta’s tour de force projection performance Path of Totality spins the most ecstatic of the cinematic from flickering loops and household objects to create a luminous show and tell that transmutates base matter to pure energy. Path of Totality anchors a program of discovered sights, found sounds, and meditations on the fragility of life and the inner lives of the inanimate. Reports from the world reinforce the urgency of our actions: forced, folded, and coaxed to motion.

SCREENING: Night Eyes (2019) by Arte MatuThe Forcing (epilogue) (2018) by Lydia MoyerFluorescent Girl (2018) by Janie GeiserValeria Street (2018) by Janie GeiserPreemptive Listening (part 1: The Fork in the Road) (2018) by Aura SatzHow to Fold a Napkin (2018) by T2R/Laura Gillmore; and Path of Totality (2017) by Jeanne Liotta
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 7
Sunday, June 9 at 12:30 pm
the end and the beginning were always there
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Community Partner: Canyon Cinema Foundation
Anticipated artists in person: Vasilios Papaioannu and Charlotte Pryce
Advance tickets available here.
Sunday, June 9 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

This program is dedicated to the memory of filmmakers Jonathan Schwartz (1973–2018) and Robert Todd (1963–2018).

Memorials to departed friends. Life is in the light; we pass through it, unevenly, but beautifully. Lines of force, spanning generations; the garden seems unchanged. Speculative science and speculative magic. Where are you, systems of planets? Thank you for your presence in this life.

SCREENING: A Leaf is the Sea is a Theatre (2018) by Jonathan Schwartz; LightFall (2016) by Robert ToddLight Licks: Pardes: Counting Flowers on the Wall (2018) by Saul LevineLines of Force (2018) by Dan BrowneTwo (2018) by Vasilios PapaioannuGathering Moss (2018) by Erin Espelie; and Pwdre Ser  the rot of stars (2018) by Charlotte Pryce
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 8
Sunday, June 9 at 2:45 pm
a friend becomes like a ghost
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artists in person: Anna Kipervasser, Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu and Rajee Samarasinghe
Advance tickets available here.
Sunday, June 9 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

Reflective films on origins and endings, on lifespan, on intergenerational dialog and communication with past and future selves. Patient enactments of transmutation. Tender animations of the inanimate. A blurred face, a distant memory, a circling back to a beginning. Inner states superimposed on the world and a universe filled with every day with stars. How long has it been since we have not seen each other?

SCREENING: Song X (2017) by Pathompon Mont TesperateepWhen It Is Still (2018) by Anna Kipervasereveryday star (2018) by Rajee SamarasingheTranscript (2018) by Erica SheuAfter DeCarava (2018) by Paige Taul; and How Old Are You? How Old Were You? (2017) by Cherlyn Hsing-Hsin Liu
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 9
Sunday, June 9 at 4:45 pm
century plant in bloom
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artists in person: Zachary Epcar, Salma Shamel, Syd Staiti and Eric Stewart
Advance tickets available here.
Sunday, June 9 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

Far-reaching and speculative video essays on digital archives, the 2011 Egyptian revolution and the visuality of contemporary surveillance cap a program on landscape, space and time in our technological and political moment. Considering magnetic desert ufology, exploring the lovely and lonely landscapes of local BART parking lots, and contemplating the aesthetics of Croatian military camouflage, these films ponder the place of humans in our mediated twenty-first century. Night vision cameras, binoculars, heat detectors and drones have their own ways of seeing the world. The landscape appears flat. The drone knows. There are 360 points in a circle.

SCREENING: POINTS (2019) by Syd Staiti; Life After Love (2018) by Zachary EpcarThe Air of the Earth in Your Lungs (2018) by Ross MeckfesselHelios (2018) by Eric StewartThose That Tremble as if They Were Mad (2018) by Salma Shamel; and Waypoint, Follow, Orbit, Focus, Track, Pan (2017) by eteam
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 program 10
Sunday, June 9 at 7 pm
i’ve returned to see how strange it feels
presented by San Francisco Cinematheque and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Anticipated artists in person: Ben Balcom and Scott Stark
Advance tickets available here.
Sunday, June 9 CROSSROADS festival day pass available here.
Join our Facebook event.

Love floats through Hollywood cinema like a flaming dirigible.
— Scott Stark

CROSSROADS 10 culminates with Scott Stark’s Love and the Epiphanists—a sprawling quasi narrative sci-fi performance hybrid based on re-printed and re-purposed Hollywood film trailers. Throughout the program, explosions, eros and (of course) apocalypse abound as history unreels and and we fade to a marvellous view. Dig and search for the meaning of such unexpected life.

SCREENING: Atomic Garden (2018) by Ana Vaz; Love Seat (2017) by Lyndsay BloomThe Sequence of Years (2018) by Ben BalcomFountains of Paris (2018) by Stephen BroomerSaturno (2019) by Colectivo Los ingrávidos; and Love and the Epiphanists (Part 1) (2018) by Scott Stark
Full program details here.


CROSSROADS 10 is generously supported by: the George Lucas Family Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fleishhacker FoundationSan Francisco Hotel Tax Fund/Grants for the Arts, the Willow Foundation, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and Cinematheque’s Members and Donors.